Max Ruf

  • Max Ruf, STADT, 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | untitled (black lines, black fields, yellow), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 165 x 135 cm

  • Max Ruf | untitled (grey field in transparent green), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 150 x 100 cm

  • Max Ruf | untitled (green lines and old english red, on grey, black and yellow), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 134 x 245 cm

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | untitled (green fields on grey fadings, yellow line, prussian blue), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 150 x 100 cm

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | untitled (phthalo green and black, around yellow lines), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 135 x 195 cm

  • Max Ruf | untitled (prussian blue lines, transparent green), 2016
    Oil on canvas | diptych - 120 x 160 cm

  • Max Ruf | untitled (object for table I), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 134 x 245 cm

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | STADT | 2016
    installation view at Múrias Centeno, Lisboa | photo credits: Bruno Lopes

  • Max Ruf | untitled (yellow ground; green, blue, red and grey lines and fields), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 245 x 134 cm

  • Max Ruf | untitled (dark blue lines, white, dark blue, orange), 2016
    Oil on canvas | 150 x 100 cm

If you look out from an empty field into a dark sky, you get the impression that you are standing on a flat plate, enclosed by a giant dome. Our perception of depth fails us, for the distant objects we see in the sky. This creates the appearance that all of the stars have the same distance.
We observe the sky as it looks, not as it is. You feel like you are on top of the Earth (the result of gravity drawing you toward the Earth’s center.) You are at a latitude (your location along an arc from the Earth’s equator to the rotation pole, given by lower case Greek letter Phi) of 45°, halfway between the Earth’s equator and the North Pole. The latitude of the North Pole is 90°, that of the equator 0°. The Earth appears to lie at the center of a fictional celestial sphere. You pretend that you are inside the sphere at the center looking out around you. Above your head is your zenith, while directly below you is your nadir (both of which are points on the celestial sphere). In between is the great circle of the horizon, which is the circle on the celestial sphere cut by a plane tangent to the Earth at your feet.
Everything in the sky above the horizon is visible, while everything below it is not.